WEEK 3

A short but busy week! I arrived at PCCI on tuesday morning and worked straight through late thursday night. Here's what was accomplished! 

I finished up the last of the fabric strips that will be a part of an installation for an upcoming show HUMANATURE. They will hang from the ceiling, forcing viewers to interact with the material as they travel into the exhibit. The colors were selected to match the palette of the artwork, mainly pastel yellows, greens, and pinks. These strips are color first with a bath of Dandelion and Horsetail ferns for the butter-yellow, then re bound and simmer in a low temp Madder bath. The top 5 strips are patterned with Arashi shibori, a technique where a corner of the material is tied to a stick, then the rest pleated and wrapped around, bound tightly with spring. The word "Arashi" is japanese, meaning storm winds, but coupled with the fleshy Madder pink I can't help but think of muscles...

 Material after an hour in Dandelion/Horsetail Fern

Material after an hour in Dandelion/Horsetail Fern

 material re-bound and soaked in Madder overnight

material re-bound and soaked in Madder overnight

Exciting results from the second batch of bundle dyes !! When creating these, I paid attention to the plants that imprinted the darkest, mainly oak and maple. I also used some dried Eucalyptus I bought from Trader Joe's nearly a year ago, Surprisingly it still yielded bright scarlet.

 Dark mirrored Oak impressions on a cotton pillowcase

Dark mirrored Oak impressions on a cotton pillowcase

 Sorrel in the center printed very dark! Deep red is from Eucalyptus

Sorrel in the center printed very dark! Deep red is from Eucalyptus

 coreopsis on a rayon bodysuit - look at those binding patterns !

coreopsis on a rayon bodysuit - look at those binding patterns !

This batch of bundles was cooked for only two days and yet turned out so much more defined. I attribute this to the fact that they were simmered in an aluminum pot, which provided extra mordant, and that the bath was mainly sumac shoots. These are high in tannins. Coreopsis are now finally blooming, which provided rich golds and oranges! some of them printed so well that you can see all of the little pistols from their centers.

I tried layering the plants on the fabric a bit differently this time. I would place a leaf with an interesting shape but that would not yield color (such as pine needles), onto the fabric first, with an oak or maple leaf behind it. The pine needles would then act as a resist, with the pigments from the oak bleeding around it and turning grey, while the silhouette of the pine would remain white. very interesting results! 

 layering trials in a bundled cotton strip

layering trials in a bundled cotton strip

While foraging for bundle dye plants I finally found some yarrow in bloom! Once more of it flowers I'll be testing the colors it makes. For now, I'll just begin blocking in the foliage, returning to it with gouache for the flowers as well as the dandelion seeds next week. 

 Yarrow blocked in 

Yarrow blocked in 

I headed for school Friday morning in order to print last weeks woodcut for HUMANATURE that evening, eeek always squeezing things in last minute. I'm really happy with the ink colors on the linen! I also printed the bottom portion of the woodcut on some of the fabric strips for the installation. Photos from the show can be seen here !

 "Grounded" woodcut print on natural Linen

"Grounded" woodcut print on natural Linen